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How Long Does Costco Cheesecake Last

How Long Does Costco Cheesecake Last? Answered

Last Updated on April 22, 2024 by Lori Walker

Costco is renowned for its tasty delights, notably its popular cheesecakes.

If you’re a Costco cheesecake fan like me, you may wonder how long it can be stored and safe to eat. 

Cheesecake can be a delicate dessert, and storing it to maximize its shelf life properly is essential.

We will explore how long Costco cheesecake lasts, the best ways to store it, and how to tell if it has gone wrong.

How Long Is Costco Cheesecake Good For?

Costco cheesecake can last for several days if stored properly. Unopened and kept in the refrigerator, it can last 5 to 7 days past the printed expiration date. 

However, it should be consumed within five days to ensure its freshness and safety once opened.

“Costco’s cheesecake, a moment of creamy delight, endures for a delicious while before whispers of time bring change.”

– Leonelli Bakery

It’s essential to keep the cheesecake refrigerated and cover it with plastic wrap or foil to prevent it from drying out or absorbing any odors from other foods in the refrigerator. 

Proper storage is critical to ensuring your Costco cheesecake [1] stays fresh and delicious for as long as possible.

But how long will chocolate cake last in the refrigerator?

How Long Can You Freeze It?

If you want to extend the shelf life of your Costco cheesecake, freezing is an excellent option. Costco cheesecake can last up to 2 months when frozen and stored correctly. 

To freeze the cheesecake, wrap it tightly in plastic wrap or aluminum foil to prevent freezer burn and preserve its freshness. You can also cut the cheesecake into slices before freezing, making it easier to thaw and serve later. 

When you’re ready to enjoy the cheesecake, remove it from the freezer and let it thaw in the refrigerator overnight.

Thawing the cheesecake slowly in the refrigerator will help prevent any changes in texture or loss of flavor.

But how can you freeze Costco pumpkin pie?

Can Costco Cheesecake Be Left Out?

No, Costco cheesecake should not be left out at room temperature for an extended period. Cheesecake is a dairy-based dessert and can spoil quickly if not properly stored. 

“Food is a huge passion of mine, and because I want to eat whatever I want, I run every morning, and then I do weights a few times a week. It’s just how I can balance eating pancakes in the morning, a big burger for lunch, and then a fat steak and cheesecake at night.”

– Matt Barr, American Actor

Leaving it out at room temperature can allow bacteria [2] to grow, which can cause foodborne illness. If the cheesecake needs to be kept at room temperature for a short period, it should be covered and consumed within two hours. 

After two hours, it should be refrigerated or frozen to ensure its safety and freshness.

Find out how long chocolate pie last in the fridge here.

How To Tell When It Has Gone Bad

sliced cheesecake
  1. Appearance: If there is any mold, discoloration, or unusual spots on the cheesecake, it should be discarded.
  2. Smell: If the cheesecake has a sour or off smell, it may have gone bad and should not be consumed.
  3. Texture: If the cheesecake feels slimy or has a watery texture, it may have spoiled and should not be eaten.
  4. Taste: If the cheesecake has an off taste or tastes sour, it may have gone bad and should not be consumed.

Tips On How To Store Costco Cheesecake?

  1. Keep it refrigerated: Cheesecake should always be stored in the refrigerator to prevent it from spoiling. It’s essential to place it in the refrigerator as soon as possible after purchasing it.
  2. Cover it: To prevent the cheesecake from drying out or absorbing any odors from other foods in the refrigerator, it’s essential to cover it with plastic wrap or foil. This will also help to preserve its flavor and texture.
  3. Keep it sealed: If the cheesecake comes in a plastic container, it must be sealed to prevent air from getting in. If you’ve removed the cheesecake from its original packaging, transfer it to an airtight container or wrap it tightly with plastic wrap.
  4. Don’t stack anything on top: To prevent the cheesecake from getting crushed, don’t stack anything on top of it in the refrigerator.
  5. Freeze it: If you need to store the cheesecake for an extended period, you can freeze it. Be sure to wrap it tightly in plastic or foil to prevent freezer burn and preserve freshness.
  6. Thaw it correctly: If you’ve frozen the cheesecake, thaw it properly in the refrigerator. Thawing it slowly will help prevent any changes in texture or loss of flavor.

Also Read: How Long Does Buttercream Last In The Refrigerator?

FAQs

Can you eat a 2-week-old cheesecake?

It is not recommended to eat a 2-week-old cheesecake, even if it has been stored in the refrigerator.

Cheesecake is a perishable food that can spoil quickly, and consuming it after it has gone wrong can lead to foodborne illness. 

How much is Costco cheesecake?

The cost of Costco cheesecake varies depending on the type and size of the cheesecake. A typical 10-inch New York-style cheesecake from Costco can cost around $13 to $16. 

However, prices may vary depending on location and current promotions or discounts. It’s best to check with your local Costco store for specific pricing and availability of their cheesecake selection.

In Conclusion

Proper storage is critical to ensuring that Costco cheesecake stays fresh and delicious for as long as possible. Unopened cheesecake can last 5 to 7 days past the printed expiration date when stored in the refrigerator. 

Once opened, it should be consumed within five days. If you want to extend the shelf life of your Costco cheesecake, it can be frozen for up to 2 months. 

To ensure its freshness, it’s essential to wrap it tightly in plastic wrap or aluminum foil before freezing. It’s essential to avoid leaving cheesecake unrefrigerated for an extended period, as it can spoil quickly and lead to foodborne illness. 

References:

  1. https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/collection/cheesecake-recipes
  2. https://www.livescience.com/51641-bacteria.html
Lori Walker

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